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Fors Marsh Group Attends Society of Behavioral Medicine Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions 2018

blog / featured / conference / health / technology / public health / health research
From April 11 to April 14, I will be representing Fors Marsh Group (FMG) at the Society of Behavioral Medicine’s (SBM) Annual Meeting & Scientific Sessions in New Orleans, LA. SBM does an excellent job showcasing both groundbreaking basic research in behavioral health as well as applications of this research in communities and policy. I am excited to be presenting my research at the poster session on April 12 titled, "Motivation or self-efficacy? Examining which construct better explains the association of body dissatisfaction with exercise." I will also be a panelist for the session, "Speed networking your career options: Non-academic paths for behavior scientists," on Friday, April 13, from 10:45 a.m.–11:45 a.m. Oftentimes, it can be difficult for Ph.D. students or junior researchers to know... more
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Can Wearable Fitness Trackers Help Meet Physical Activity Goals?

featured / blog / health / technology / behavioral change

Wearables, Fitness Trackers, Fors Marsh Group, New Year’s Resolution

Similar to in years past, weight loss behaviors such as diet and exercise are among the most popular New Year’s resolutions in 2018. But in order to increase their exercise behaviors successfully, people must be able to accurately measure their exercise. Unfortunately, most of us are notoriously bad at doing this ourselves. Research shows that people often overestimate their exercise intensity, frequency, duration, and calories burned from activity. Therefore, there is a need for easy, affordable ways to assess physical activity accurately—both for individuals hoping to improve their health and for scientists studying physical activity.... more
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The Risks of Copying and Pasting: Health Technology, Human Error, and User Experience Design

user experience / client work / health / technology / featured
If you use any kind of word processing software, chances are you are pretty familiar with the copy-and-paste functions. Using them is an easy way to avoid retyping the same information, and you probably do it without a second thought. But when it comes to electronic health records, copy-and-paste functions can potentially lead to errors in health records, putting patients at risk. On the one hand, copy-and-paste functions are vital in helping health care professionals save time and document all necessary patient information; but these functions can lead to substandard health records if providers copy and paste the wrong information, fail to update information after copying and pasting, or copy and paste extraneous information. FMG recently completed a study to examine the ways in which... more
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